Live Performance of L. Ron Hubbard’s Science Fiction Short “Tough Old Man”

This weekend, my wife and I attended another excellent performance of L. Ron Hubbard‘s Stories from the Golden Age at the Founding Church of Scientology in Washington, DC.

Like the earlier performances I’ve written about, including LRH’s sci-fi short “Battling Bolto”, and the quite-entertaining performance of “One Was Stubborn”, the performance was a multicast audio reading of one of Mr. Hubbard’s stories from the 1930’s golden age of pulp fiction, and was done replete with lighting and audio effects to make it a rather immersive performance.    Author Services, the literary agent for Mr. Hubbard’s works, does a tour through the area once a year, and these performances are always a treat.

I’ve been listening to more and more of these stories lately, seeing as I have to take an 8-hour each-way road trip once per month for work, and audiobooks like these make an excellent trip companion.

If you want to get hold of this story itself, it’s one of the short stories in the book When Shadows Fall which you can get here.

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Posted in L. Ron Hubbard

The “Sickness of Long Thinking”

Just listened to a really nifty quote in the Life Continuum lectures, as part of my study of the Scientology Basics.  It’s in the lecture entitled “Yes, No and Maybe”, and LRH is talking about how terrible it is to just sit there, stuck in a “maybe”.   He says:

“You would be amazed how much action anyone is capable of. A person sits around and thinks too long…Indians used to have a name for it.  It’s called the “sickness of long thinking”.  Starts dropping back out of action, starts restimulating old maybes – anything to keep busy.  The next thing you know, the fellow is really enforcing inaction upon himself because of this restimulation.  If he can just pick himself up by the bootstraps and throw himself out willy-nilly into some kind of action – preferably dangerous action, preferably dangerous action – he sometimes comes up right as rain.”  – LRH

I thought that a fitting and useful quote for attacking life!

Posted in L. Ron Hubbard

Nice to See it Back in Action

The new National Affairs Office, originally uploaded by tadnkat.

I snapped this pic on my way back to the Metro today. It’s awful nice to see the Fraser Mansion back in action as the new Church of Scientology National Office. I’ve got so many fantastic memories of being on staff there – I know virtually every square inch of that building. Well, at least I used to. The renos in the building for its new purpose as a meeting ground for all of the Church’s social betterment programs has definitely changed a few of the spaces.

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Posted in Scientology

Ribbon is Cut!



Ribbon is Cut!, originally uploaded by tadnkat.

Posted in Uncategorized

What if Sysadmins Acted Like Psychiatrists?

Philadelphia Psychiatry Protest at the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Annual Meeting

Philadelphia Psychiatry Protest at the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Annual Meeting

I sometimes run into people that try to tell me that my views on psychiatry are wrong because “depression is a real problem” and so forth.  I’m not, and have never disputed whether or not the phenomena that psychiatrists observe in the DSM are acutally observable.  They definitely are.  It’s what is then done with that observation that sets apart psycho-pharmacology and every other profession of earth.

By drugging to “ameliorate symptoms” (actual words used in drug literature) they’re looking to numb the observability of the symptoms rather than handle the root cause.

Dogbert the Systems Administrator - Dilbert

What if Sysadmins Operated like Psychiatrists?

So, to illustrate this, what if a system administrator operated like a psychiatrist?

Scenario:  A user comes up to the sysadmin, frantic.  He says, “You need to help me – the server is down.”

When asked what behaviour he’s seeing, he says  that there’s a message on the screen saying it can’t connect to the server.

“Ah – so your problem is that you’re seeing an error message on the screen!”

The sysadmin would then have an array of powerful tools at his disposal to handle the problem he can:

  • Hang a piece of construction paper over the screen so that the user can no longer see the error message
  • Install a plugin on his browser to suppress the error message from coming up,
  • Write some dummy code to make the user think the site is working when it’s in fact not
  • Simply power off the computer (as it will then no longer display the error message)
  • Change the user’s computer’s UI language to Icelandic so that he can’t understand whether the software is working or not (“It says – ‘Þessi hugbúnaður er completetely helvíti!’ — that must mean it’s working!!”
  • Hook up a monitor from someone else’s computer to the user’s desktop, so they can think they’re doing work

There are a nearly infinite number of ways that a sysadmin could go about describing the problem describing how the error makes you feel, etc.

One could say that the error message is due to an imbalance of electricity in the computer which is causing it to display an error message, and the handling is to rebalance things so that the error message doesn’t display.

None of these things fix the fact that the user cannot connect to the server and get work done.

Obviously, sysadmins cannot operate that way, as everyone knows that computer systems should work, and a good sysadmin can debug a system, find the root cause, handle it, and get the system working again.

Drug company marketing, however, has been working hard to convince the public that the root cause is a chemical imbalance in the brain (a marketing gimmick) or that the root cause can simply not be handled.  One just “has a condition” which nothing can be done about except making it “easier to live with.”

This video on the marketing of insanity is worth a view.  It’s good to know whether or not what’s been told to you as a “medical fact” is really just a marketing pitch to obscure the fact that the doctors you’re talking to don’t actually know how to handle the root cause of your problems.

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Posted in Marketing, psychiatry

Philadelphia Anti-Psychiatry Protest

Psychiatry is a Human Rights TragedyDon't Drug Me.Holding her Sign HighProtesting the Drugging of ChildrenDon't You Dare Drug My DaughterAnti-Psychiatry Protest
Anti-Psychiatry ProtestAnti-Psychiatry ProtestMommy at Independence ParkPosing at Independence ParkChill E.B. Leading Anti-Psych DemonstrationAnti-Psychiatry Demonstration
Psych Demonstration

Philadelphia Psychbust, a set on Flickr.

I got back from Philadelphia late last night, so I’ve only just gotten to upload a few photos – but we definitely had a thing or two to say about the APA’s new DSM V release party.

My daughter’s opinion on the matter?

“In that big building are PSYCHS. They are bad men and they get a sad face and they get NO TREATS.”

Posted in Uncategorized

The Jive Aces are on Spotify

And as an FYI, in case you hadn’t heard, the UK’s #1 Swing Band, The Jive Aces have a bunch of their recent tunes out there on Spotify right now.

The Jives are my favorite swing band, and listening to them at work is a constant reminder to me that I need to somehow get back into swinging with my wife.

Wife Swing Dancing at the IAS Christmas Ball

Wife Swing Dancing with the Jive Aces at the 2001 IAS Christmas Ball

 

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Posted in Hi-Tech
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